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Course Code: 
PSIR 211
Course Period: 
Autumn
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Application: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
6
Course Language: 
İngilizce
Course Objectives: 

This course aims to familiarize its participants with the terminology and concepts of mainstream IR perspectives of realism and liberalism as well as provide students with theoretical tools and frameworks of analysis helping to understand the international syste

Course Content: 

To accomplish this objective the course tries to answer  questions such as: What is the international system? What is the difference between focusing on human nature or structure of international system. What is the difference between focusing on states as  main  actors  or  non-­‐state  actors  or  both  of  them.  How  power  is defined and why it is so important? What do the concepts such as anarchy,  power  struggle,  security,  survival,  national  interest,  self-­‐help, security dilemma, balance of power, balance of threat, soft balancing, bandwagoning, interdependence, perpetual peace, international institutions mean? How the current international system has been evolved from Second World War to todays and how scholars have responded theoreticaly these changes and what kinds of ‘maps’ they provided to explain, understand and direct these developments? Why such different approaches has been developed? What are the  strengths

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing, B. Exams, C: Homework

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes

 

Teaching Methods

 

Assessment Methods

list the basic assumptions of realist and liberal International Relations perspectives,

 

 

 

3,7

 

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

 

A

explain how theories have changed in times

 

 

4,6,7

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

A

recognize      the      differences      within      realist     and      liberal perspectives and between realist and liberal perpectives,

 

 

 

5,7

 

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

 

A

compare and contrast the ideas of various realist and liberal perspectives and also the ideas of variations of each perspectives

 

 

 

5,6,7

 

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

 

A

describe how different realist and liberal perspectives criticize each other

 

 

 

5,6,8

 

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

 

A

interpret the passages of different IR scholars and manipulate on them.

 

 

 

5,6,8

 

 

 

1,2,3

 

 

 

A

Course Flow

COURSE CONTENT
Weeks Topics Study Materials
1 Introduction

Why we need to theories or functions of a theory

 
2 Basic assumptions and propositions of Realism  Joseph M. Grieco (1997), Realist International Theory and The Study of World Politics, 163-­‐201
3 Classical Realism (Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes) and Neo-­‐

 classical Realism: (E.H. Carr and H. Morgenthau

Hans

Morgenthau  “Six

Principles of

Political Realism”

in  Art  &Jervis IP:

7-­‐14

4 Neo-realism or Structural realism Kenneth Waltz

(1979), “The

Anarchic

Structure of

WorldPolitics”

in IP 29-49

Kenneth           

 

Waltz

(1988), “The

Origins of War  in Neo-realist

Theory” 615-­628

 

5 End of the Cold War and the Realism Kenneth Waltz

(1993)  “The

Emerging Structure of

International

Politics” 44‐79

6 Balance of Power Theory: Henner Fürtig

“Conflict and Cooperation  in the Persian Gulf: The Interregional Order and US Policy” 627‐640

 

Morgenthau, “Balance of

Power” and “Different Methods of B of P” (ERWP)

7 Effects of Unipolarity over Balance of Power Theory: New Types ofBalancing Christopher Layne (2006) “The Unipolar Illusion

Revisited”7‐41

 

Robert Pape (2005) “Soft

Balancing Against the US”7‐45

8 Critiques to Neorealism: Anarchy versus Hierarchy David   Lake (2009) “Regional Hierarchy, Authority and Local IN Order” 35‐58

 David                                                                                                               Kang

(2003)

“Hierarchy, Balancingand Emprical Puzzles in   Asian   IR”165-­‐ 180

9 Critiques   to  Neorealism:   International   Politics  versus  Domestic  Politics,     James   Fearon (1998)   Domestic Foreign

Politics  Policyand

Theories of IR, 289-313

10 MID TERM  
11 Republican Liberalism and Idealism  Kant,    “To

Perpetual  Peace: A Philosophical Sketch” in CIR: 368-76

 

Wilson, “The World Must Be Made         Safe for Democracy” and “Fourteen   Points”  in CIR: 35‐40.

12  

Democratic Peace Theory and Realists Critiques of it

Michael Doyle “Democratic Peace Theory”

 

Christopher Layne, “Kant or Cant: The Myth of  The

Democratic Peace” in ERWP: 397-­‐420

13  

Interdependence Liberalism

 

Keohane and Nye, “Complex Interdependence and the Role of Force” in IP:

14 Review Related sections of

the textbook

15 Review Related sections of

the textbook

16 Final Related sections of

the textbook

 

Recommended Sources

 

RECOMMENDED SOURCES

 

 

Textbook

 

Additional Resources  Resources are updated at the beginning of term

Material Sharing

 

MATERIAL SHARING

Documents           Library
Assignments
Exams                   Exams will be held in the rooms

Assessment

 

ASSESSMENT

 

IN-TERM STUDIES

 

NUMBER

 

PERCENTAGE

Evaluation I 1 40
Evaluation II
Participation
  Total 1 40
CONTRIBUTION OF THE PAPER TO OVERALL GRADE 1 60
CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE
  Total 100 100

Course’s Contribution to Program

 

COURSE'S CONTRIBUTION TO PROGRAM

 

No

 

Program Learning Outcomes

 

Contribution

1 2 3 4 5
 

 

1

Students will demonstrate their comprehensive knowledge of the basic concepts and theories of Political Science and International Relations as well as other related disciplines such as Law, Economics and Sociology.          

 

X

 

 

 

2

Students will interpret the structure, institutions and operation  of national, international and supranational entities via utilization of the concepts and theories of Political Science  and  International relations and produce project reports that include possible solutions to problems of such institutions when necessary.          

 

 

X

 

3

Students will demonstrate that they have developed a comparative, analytical and interdisciplinary approach vis-à-vis human societies and political systems.      

X

   
 

 

4

Students will have improved their skills and awareness of personal responsibility and team membership through  conducting group or independent research projects, doing internships and producing their graduation dissertations.  

 

X

       
Students   will   demonsrate   proficiency   in   quantitative    and

5    qualitative data collections methods.

X        
 

 

 

6

Students will prove their understanding of the rapidly-evolving dynamics of national and global environments requires constant self-assessment, life-long learning, and the ability to formulate innovative solutions to maintain their personal and professional development.        

 

X

 
 

7

Students should be able to critically evaluate the body of knowledge in political science, assess self-competency and direct self-learning efforts accordingly.        

X

 
Students will implement written and oral communication skills  in

8    English and Turkish in both academic and professional settings.

    X    
 

 

9

Students should be able to effectively demonstrate their knowledge of written, oral and reading skills in English both in international institutional settings and follow and interpret the global dynamics of the International Relations discipline.          

 

X

10

 

11

 

12

Students will demonstrate their social skills and experience required by public or private institutions or in the academia.   X      
Students will show empathy and respect towards societies other than one’s own.   X      
Students should be able to effectively utilize computer and information technologies commonly-used in the social sciences. X        
 

13

Students will interpret domestic and international developments and express opinions, having acquired advanced knowledge and proficiency in the via communication with international scholars and students.      

X

   
14

 

15

Students will respect personal, social and academic ethical norms.         X
Students should understand the personal, social, and ecological dimensions of social responsibility, and show duties of active and X        

ECTS

 

Activities

 

Quantity

 

Duration (Hour)

Total Workload (Hour)

Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours)

 

16

 

3

 

48

Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice)

16

     4

48

Evaluation I

1

  15

15

Evaluation II                                                                                   1             15           15

Paper                                                                                            3             8              24

Total Work Load

 

 

150

Total Work Load / 25 (h)

 

 

6

ECTS Credit of the Course

 

 

6