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Course Code: 
PSIR 212
Course Period: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Application: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
7
Course Language: 
İngilizce
Course Objectives: 

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to the Post-Positivist/ Critical Theories of International Relations.

Course Content: 

The course concentrates upon the basic assumptions, conceptions and methods of more recent theoretical approaches to International Relations: Social Constructivism, Critical IR Theory, Post-Modernism and Feminism.

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing, C: Homework, D: Discussion

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes

Teaching Methods

Assessment Methods

Students will be able to outline the basic assumptions and arguments of the Critical theories of International Relations (Constructivism, Critical Theory, Post-Modernism and Feminist Theory of IR).

1,2,8,9

1,2,3

A

Students will be able to compare the basic assumptions of more recent Critical IR theories as to ‘how world politics works’ to those of Classical IR Theories (Realism and Liberalism).

1,2,3,8

1,2,3

A

They will also be able to distinguish Classical Theories from Critical Theories in terms of their respective epistemological approaches.

3,5,6,10

1,2,3

A,D

Students will also be able to be interpret both historical and contemporary developments in world politics from the perspectives of competing approaches to IR.

3,5,6,10

1,2,3

A,D

Having learnt the shortcomings of various intellectual IR traditions, students will be able to theoretically analyze and critically evaluate the potential and real implications of the foreign policies of major international actors for world peace and security.

For example, they will be able to tell that the American invasion of Iraq in 2003 was formulated largely on the basis of Realist assumptions about national and international security. And then, from an alternative perspective, for instance, that of the Critical Security Theory, they will be able to critically assess its consequences for both American and world security.

1,2,3,

8, 9,10

1,2,3

A,D

 

Course Flow

Week

Topics

Study Materials

1

A general review of Realism and Liberalism as a background and anti-thesis for the critical theories of IR .

 

2

Economic Structuralism- Classical and Radical Dependency Theories

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010): 185-196, 206-209.
  • J.A. Hobson, “The Economic Taproots of Imperialism” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.212-214.
  • R.Cox, “Gramsci, Hegemony and International Relations” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.215-225.
  • Mingst (2004) “The Radical Perspective” pp: 71-74.

3

Economic Structuralism- Wallerstein’s Capitalist World System Theory

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010): 185-193, 196-202, 206-209.
  • I.Wallerstein, “The Modern World System as a Capitalist World-Economy,” Viotti & Kauppi, pp.225-236.
  • Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise&Demise of the CWS” in Mingst&Snyder (2001):149-57
  • Immanuel Wallerstein, “Patterns and Perspectives of the Capitalist World-Economy,” Viotti & Kauppi (1999), pp. 369-376.

4

The English School: International Society and Grotian Rationalism

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 242-254.
  • H.Grotius, “War, Peace & the Law of the Nations” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.255-259.
  • H.Grotius, “Freedom of the Sees” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.259-261.
  • Tim Dunne, “Inventing International Society” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.261-267.
  • Hedley Bull, “Does Order Exist in World Politics?” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.268-270.

5

Constructivism

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.276-296.
  • Alexander Wendt, “Constructing International Politics” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.299-306.

6

Constructivism

 

  • Alexander Wendt, “The Lockean Culture” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.307-315.
  • M. Finnemore, “Constructing Norms of Humanitarian Intervention” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp.319-326.

7

Mid-Term Exam

 

8

Critical IR Theory

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 332-345.
  • Richard Devetak, “Critical Theory,” pp.145-177.
  • Ken Booth, “Critical Explorations& the Highway of Critical Security Theory” Viotti & Kauppi, pp:347-355.

9

Critical IR Theory

 

  • Simon Murden, “Cultural Conflict in International Relations: The West and Islam,” in The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations ed. by John Baylis & Steve Smith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp.374-388.
  • David Campbell, “Writing Security” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 364-370.

10

Post-Modern Theory of International Relations

 

  • Richard Devetak, “Postmodernism,” pp.179-209.
  • Simon Murden, “Cultural Conflict in International Relations: The West and Islam,” in The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations ed. by John Baylis & Steve Smith (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp.374-388.

11

Feminist Understandings in IR Theory

 

  • I.M.Young, “The Logic of Masculinist Protection” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 386-393.
  • Ann Ticker, “Why Women Can’t Rule the World” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 394-399.
  • Ann Ticker, “Man, the State, and War: Gendered Perspective on National Security” in Mingst &Snyder (2001): 60-69.

12

Normative Considerations and IR Theory

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi (2010) pp: 404-424.
  • Immanuel Kant, “Morality, Politics, & Perpetual Peace” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 426-431.
  • E.H.Carr, “The Nature of Politics” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 431-434.
  • Williams&Caldwell, “Just War Theory & the Principles of Just Peace” Viotti & Kauppi (2010), pp: 435-43.

13

IR Theory, Civil Society, Religion, Identity

 

  • Viotti & Kauppi, “Religion, Nationalism& Conflicting Identities” IR&World Politics 2006, pp:454-489.

 

14

General Review

 

 

15

Conclusion

 

 

 

Recommended Sources

Textbook

  • P. Viotti & M. Kauppi, International Relations Theory (NY: Longman 2011 5th ed.)

Additional Resources

  • Karen Mingst, Essentials of International Relations (NY: Norton & Company, 2004)
  • Karen Mingst&J. Snyder, Essential Readings in World Politics (NY: Norton&Company, 2001)
 

 

Material Sharing

Documents

 

Assignments

Weekly reports.

Exams

Mid-term and final exams taken in the classroom

 

 

Assessment

IN-TERM STUDIES

NUMBER

PERCENTAGE

Mid-terms

1

40

Final Exam

1

60

 

 

 

Total

 

100

CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE

 

60

CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE

 

40

Total

 

100

 

 

COURSE CATEGORY

Expertise/Field Courses

 

Course’s Contribution to Program

No

Program Learning Outcomes

Contribution

1

2

3

4

5

1

Students will demonstrate their comprehensive knowledge of the basic concepts and theories of Political Science and International Relations as well as other related disciplines such as Law, Economics and Sociology.

       

X

2

Students will interpret the structure, institutions and operation of national, international and supranational entities via utilization of the concepts and theories of Political Science and International relations and produce project reports that include possible solutions to problems of such institutions when necessary.

       

X

3

Students will demonstrate that they have developed a comparative, analytical and interdisciplinary approach vis-à-vis human societies and political systems.

     

X

 

4

Students will have improved their skills and awareness of personal responsibility and team membership through conducting group or independent research projects, doing internships and producing their graduation dissertations.

X

       

5

Students will demonsrate proficiency in quantitative and qualitative data collections methods.

X

       

6

Students will prove their understanding of  the rapidly-evolving dynamics of national and global environments requires  constant self-assessment, life-long learning, and the ability to formulate innovative solutions to maintain their personal and professional development.

 

X

     

7

Students should be able to critically evaluate the body of knowledge in political science, assess self-competency and direct self-learning efforts accordingly.

 

X

     

8

Students will implement written and oral communication skills in English and Turkish in both academic and professional settings.

     

X

 

9

Students should be able to effectively demonstrate their knowledge of written,  oral and reading skills in English both in international institutional settings and follow and interpret the global dynamics of the International Relations discipline.

     

X

 

10

Students will demonstrate their social skills and experience required by public or private institutions or in the academia.

     

X

 

11

Students will show empathy and respect towards societies other than one’s own.

X

       

12

Students should be able to effectively utilize computer and information technologies commonly-used in the social sciences.

X

       

13

Students will interpret domestic and international developments and express opinions, having acquired advanced knowledge and proficiency in the via communication with international scholars and students.

X

       

14

Students will respect personal, social and academic ethical norms.

       

X

15

Students should understand the personal, social, and ecological dimensions of social responsibility, and show duties of active and global citizenship.

X

       

16

Students should know that universality of social-political and legal rights and social justice are the principle components of contemporary society, and that scientific thinking is an essential prerequisite for maintaining social advancement and global competitiveness.

X

       
 

ECTS

Activities Quantity Duration
(Hour)
Total
Workload
(Hour)
Course Duration (Including the final exam week: 16x Total course hours) 16 3 48
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 16 4 64
Mid-term 1 23 23
Final examination 1 40 40
Total Work Load     175
Total Work Load / 25 (h)     7
ECTS Credit of the Course     7