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Course Code: 
PSIR 361
Course Type: 
Elective
P: 
3
Application: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
5
Course Language: 
İngilizce
Course Objectives: 

This course is designed to inform students on the various foreign policy issues that confront Turkey.

Course Content: 

The course concentrates to identify and analyze the consequences of the various crises and regional problems between Turkey and its neighbors. Turkey’s Transatlantic ties, and its relations with the EU and European countries, Turkey's relations with the countries in the Balkans, Middle East and North and Sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Caucasus, Central Asia will be examined. 

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Discussion,
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing, B: Homework, D: Discussion

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes

Teaching Methods

Assessment Methods

Students will identify the main issues of Turkish Foreign Policy

1

1,2

A

Students will identify central players

 

2

1,2

A

Students will classify main areas of conflicts in Turkish Foreign Policy.

2,10

1,2

A,D

Students will be able to define Turkish policy preferences on main issues that are covered

 

2,10

1,2

A,D

Students will compare Turkish position with that of related actors

3

1,2

A,D

Students shall be able to compare Turkish position with different perspectives of related actors and illustrate the major similarities and differences between political actors

 

3,10

1,2

A,D

 

Course Flow

Week

Topics

Study Materials

1

Meeting and introduction of the course.

 

2

Turkish Foreign Policy in 21st century:

Mustafa Aydın, “The Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy, and Turkey’s European Vocation,” The Review of International Affairs, Vol.3, No.2, Winter 2003

Alexander Murinson, “Turkish Foreign Policy in the Twenty-First Century”  Mideast Security and Policy Studies No. 97,  The Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies Bar-Ilan University, Sept 2012

Related sections of the reader

3

Transformation of TFP

 “Turkey's Foreign Policy in a Changing World” International Conference Presentations, Oxford 30 April – 2 May 2010

Kemal Kirişci, “The transformation of Turkish foreign policy: The rise of the trading state” New Perspectives on Turkey, no. 40 (2009): 29-57.

Related sections of the reader

4

Turkey and Europe

E. Fuat Keyman & Yusuf Ziya Öniş, Turkish Politics in a Changing World – Global Dynamics and Domestic Transformations, İstanbul Bilgi University Press, İstanbul, 2007, pp. 56-101.

Mustafa Aydın Sinem Açıkmeşe, “Europeanization Through EU Conditionality: Understanding the new Era in Turkish Foreign Policy”, Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans, Volume 9, no 3, December 2007, pp 263-274.

Related sections of the reader

5

 

Turkey and Europe; EU Accession Process

Ziya Önis, “Luxembourg, Helsinki and Beyond: Towards an Interpretation of Recent Turkey-EU Relations,” Government & Opposition, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Fall 2000),

Ziya Öniş, “Turkey-EU Relations: Beyond the Current Stalemate” Insight Turkey Vol. 10 / No. 4 / 2008 pp. 35-50

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related sections of the reader

6

Turkish Arab relations:

Cengiz Çandar, “Turkish Foreign Policy and the War on Iraq”, The Future of Turkish Foreign Policy, Lenore G. Martin and Dimitris Keridis (eds.), The MIT Press, Cambridge, 2004, pp. 47-63.

Dietrich Jung, “Turkey and the Arab World: Historical Narratives and New Political Realities”, Mediterranean Politics, Vol 10, No 1, March 2005, pp. 1-17.

Related sections of the reader

7

Midterm Exam

 

8

Turkish Persian/Israeli Relations:

Joshua Walker, “Turkey and Israel’s Relationship in the Middle East”, Mediterranean Quarterly, Vol 17, No 4, 2006, pp. 60-90.

Michael B. Bishku, “How has Turkey Viewed Israel?”, Israel Affairs, Vol 12, No 1, January 2006, pp. 177-194.

Bulent Aras, “Turkish Foreign Policy towards Iran: Ideology and Foreign Policy in

Flux,” Journal of Third World Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1(Spring 2001), pp 105-124.

P. Robins, “Silent Competition: Iran and Turkey in the New Muslim Republics,”JIME Review, No. 21 (1993), pp. 37-51

Aaron Stein and Phillip C Bleek: Turkish-Iranian Relations: From “Friends with Benefits” to “It’s Complicated” Insight Turkey, vol 14, no 4, 2012

Related sections of the reader

9

Turkey and Eurasia; Identity

Nasuh Uslu, “The Russian, Caucassian and Central Asian Aspects of Turkish Foreign Policy in the Post Cold War Period”, Alternatives, Vol: 2, No: 3-4, Fall-Winter 2003, pp. 164-187.

 

Laurent Ruseckas,”Turkey and Eurasia,” Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 54,No. 1 (Fall 2000), pp. 217-236.

B.E. Behar, “Turkism in Turkey and Azerbaijan in the 1990s,” Eurasian Studies., No.3(1996), 2-20.

Related sections of the reader

10

Turkey and Eurasia; Turkish Armenian Problem

154-Svante E. Cornell, “Turkey and the Conflict in Nagorno Karabakh,” MES, Vol. 34, No. 1(Jan. 1998), pp. 51-72.

Papazian, “Misplaced Credulity’, Contemporary Turkish Atttempts to Refute the Armenian Genocide,” Armenian Review Vol. 45, Nos. 1-2 (1992), pp. 185-213.

Guenter Lewy “Revisiting the Armenian Genocide” Middle East Quarterly Fall 2005, pp. 3-12

Related sections of the reader

11

Turkey and Eurasia; Energy

Gökhan Bacık, “Turkey and the Pipeline Politics”, Turkish Studies, Vol 7, No 2, June 2006, pp. 293-306.

Stephen Blank, “Every Shark East of Suez: Great Power Interests, Policies and

Tactics in the Caspian Energy Wars,” CAS, Vol. 18, No. 2(June 1999), pp.149-184

Related sections of the reader

12

Cyprus Problem

Panayotis J. Tsakonas & Thanos P. Dakos, “Greek-Turkish Relations in the Early Twenty-first Century: A View from Athens”, The Future of Turkish Foreign Policy, Lenore G. Martin and Dimitris Keridis (eds.), The MIT Press, Cambridge, 2004, pp. 101-127.

Stephen F. Larrabee, “The EU Needs to Rethink Its Cyprus Policy,” Survival, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Autumn 1998), pp. 25-29. (Responds to Prodhomou)

Tozun Bahcheli, “Searching for a Cyprus Settlement: Considering Options for Creating a Federation, a Confederation, or two Independent States,” Publius, Vol. 30, No.1/2 (2000), pp. 203-216.

Related sections of the reader

13

 

 

Turkish US relations

Ian O. Lesser, “Turkey and the United States: Anatomy of a Strategic Relationship”, The Future of Turkish Foreign Policy, Lenore G. Martin and Dimitris Keridis (eds.), The MIT Press, Cambridge, 2004, pp. 83-101

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related sections of the reader

14

Final Exam  

 
 

Recommended Sources

Textbook

The Reader

Additional Resources

---

 

Material Sharing

Documents

 

Assignments

A short essay as position paper for every other week on articles covered in the course content.

Exams

Midterm and final essays taken in the classroom

 

Assessment

IN-TERM STUDIES

NUMBER

PERCENTAGE

Mid-terms

1

25

Participation, position paper, news discussion, and Attendance

1

40

Final-exam

1

35

Total

 

100

CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE

 

35

CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE

 

65

Total

 

100

 

 

COURSE CATEGORY

Expertise/Field Courses

 

Course’s Contribution to Program

No

Program Learning Outcomes

Contribution

1

2

3

4

5

1

Students will demonstrate their comprehensive knowledge of the basic concepts and theories of Political Science and International Relations as well as other related disciplines such as Law, Economics and Sociology.

     

X

 

2

Students will interpret the structure, institutions and operation of national, international and supranational entities via utilization of the concepts and theories of Political Science and International relations and produce project reports that include possible solutions to problems of such institutions when necessary.

   

X

   

3

Students will demonstrate that they have developed a comparative, analytical and interdisciplinary approach vis-à-vis human societies and political systems.

   

X

   

4

Students will have improved their skills and awareness of personal responsibility and team membership through conducting group or independent research projects, doing internships and producing their graduation dissertations.

X

       

5

Students will demonsrate proficiency in quantitative and qualitative data collections methods.

   

X

   

6

Students will prove their understanding of  the rapidly-evolving dynamics of national and global environments requires  constant self-assessment, life-long learning, and the ability to formulate innovative solutions to maintain their personal and professional development.

       

X

7

Students should be able to critically evaluate the body of knowledge in political science, assess self-competency and direct self-learning efforts accordingly.

       

X

8

Students will implement written and oral communication skills in English and Turkish in both academic and professional settings.

     

X

 

9

Students should be able to effectively demonstrate their knowledge of written,  oral and reading skills in English both in international institutional settings and follow and interpret the global dynamics of the International Relations discipline.

       

X

10

Students will demonstrate their social skills and experience required by public or private institutions or in the academia.

       

X

11

Students will show empathy and respect towards societies other than one’s own.

X

       

12

Students should be able to effectively utilize computer and information technologies commonly-used in the social sciences.

   

X

   

13

Students will interpret domestic and international developments and express opinions, having acquired advanced knowledge and proficiency in the via communication with international scholars and students.

 

X

     

14

Students will respect personal, social and academic ethical norms.

       

X

15

Students should understand the personal, social, and ecological dimensions of social responsibility, and show duties of active and global citizenship.

X

       

16

Students should know that universality of social-political and legal rights and social justice are the principle components of contemporary society, and that scientific thinking is an essential prerequisite for maintaining social advancement and global competitiveness.

X

       
 

ECTS

Activities

Quantity

Duration
(Hour)

Total
Workload
(Hour)

Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours)

16

3

48

Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice)

16

3

48

Mid-terms

1

10

10

Homework

1

4

4

Final examination

1

15

15

Total Work Load

 

 

125

Total Work Load / 25 (h)

 

 

5

ECTS Credit of the Course

 

 

5